EGR 224/Spring 2012/Test 1

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This page contains the list of topics for EGR 224 Test 1. Post questions or requests for clarification to the discussion page.

Previous Tests

Previous EGR 224 tests are available at Dr. G's Big Box of Random. Note that the EGR 224 Test I from 2008 is not as relevant to the current course as the 2009-2011 tests are. Also note that the instructions on the front of the 2012 test will be very similar to the instructions on the front of the 2011 test. Furthermore, the following problems from other classes' tests are relevant:

  • BME 153 Test 1 Spring 2009
    All
  • ECE 61 Test 1 Spring 2001
    I-IV
  • ECE 61 Test 1 Fall 2001
    I-IV
  • ECE 61 Test 2 Spring 2001
    II-III
  • ECE 61 Test 2 Fall 2001
    II

Test I Spring 2012 Coverage

  1. Basic electrical entities - be able to fill in the following chart:
    \begin{align}
\begin{array}{cccc}
\mbox{Name} & \mbox{Variable} & \mbox{Units} & \mbox{Equation} \\ \hline \hline
\mbox{charge} & q & \mbox{coulombs (C)} & q(t) = q(t_0) + \int_{t_0}^t i(\tau)~d\tau \\ \hline
\mbox{current} & i & \mbox{amperes (A)} & i = \frac{dq}{dt} \\ \hline
\mbox{work} & w & \mbox{joules (J)} & \\ \hline
\mbox{voltage} & v & \mbox{volts (V)} & v = \frac{dw}{dq} \\ \hline
\mbox{power} & p & \mbox{watts (W)} & p = \frac{dw}{dt} = vi \\ \hline
\mbox{resistance} & R & \mbox{ohms}~(\Omega) & R = \frac{v}{i} \\ \hline
\mbox{conductance} & G & \mbox{mhos}~(\mho) & \\ \hline
\end{array} \end{align}
  2. Power - know the general equation for instantaneous power absorbed or delivered by an element, and know three equations that can be used to calculate power in a resistive element. Know the difference between absorbed power and delivered power. Be able to solve circuit variables using the idea that net power in a circuit is zero.
  3. Sources - know the four kinds of dependent source and the properties of sources (i.e. current sources can have any voltage across them and voltage sources can have any amount of current through them).
  4. Ohm’s Law - know Ohm’s Law and the requirement of the passive sign convention for resistors.
  5. Kirchhoff’s Laws - know what Kirchhoff’s Laws are, be able to state them clearly in words, and be able to apply them to circuit elements to solve for unknown currents and voltages.
  6. Equivalent resistances - be able to simplify a resistive network with series and parallel resistances.
  7. Node voltage method - be able to solve for voltages, currents, and power absorbed or delivered by clearly using the node voltage method to determine node voltages, possibly followed by functions of those node voltages to get currents or powers.
  8. Mesh current method - be able to solve for voltages, currents, and powers absorbed or delivered by clearly using the mesh current method to determine mesh currents, possibly followed by functions of those currents to get branch currents, voltages, or powers.
  9. Current and Voltage division - be able to efficiently solve circuit problems by using current and voltage division.
  10. Superposition - be able to efficiently solve circuit problems by using superposition.
    • In life, remember that dependent sources must be included in the different subdivisions of a superposition problem regardless of the independent source or sources you leave on. On the test however, the superposition problem -- if there is one -- will not have a dependent source.
  11. Thévenin and Norton Equivalent Circuits - be able to solve for the source and resistance of a Thévenin or Norton Equivalent Circuit for a circuit comprised of independent and dependent sources and resistors. Be able to draw both Thévenin and Norton Equivalent Circuits. Be able to use Thévenin and Norton Equivalent Circuits to determine the maximum power delivered to a load and the required resistance of that load to receive the maximum power.

Specifically Not On The Test

  1. The branch current method
  2. Reactive elements (capacitors and inductors)
  3. Maple
  4. MATLAB